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Archive for the ‘photo restoration’ Category

WW1 a glimpse into the past

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WW1 was a war with many battles over many countries. There are thousands of individual stories to be told. These are just a few images from one mans story.

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Mr Driver served in many campaigns during WW1 and climbed through the Military ranks, we know which campaigns he served in as he inscribed them all on the inside edge of his brass binoculars. The list was impressive to say the least. List follows, Ypes, Cassel, Poperinge, Kemmel Hill, Armentiers, Albert, Bazentin Le Grand, Martinsart, Corbie, Proyaert, Ploesteert Bailleul, Ypres, Fricourt, Mametz Wood, Aveluy Wood, Hamel, Morcourt

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from clockwise:- A Battery 79B DERFA Sub-Atlerns, Lieutenant F Medhurst and Driver in a trench at Martinsat, Baeumont-Hammel, Lewis gun

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Here are four pictures from his travels

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from clockwise:- A Battery 79B DERFA Sub-Atlerns, Lieutenant F Medhurst and Driver in a trench at Martinsat, Baeumont-Hammel, Lewis gun

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Moral was very difficult to keep in the trenches, here is a quote from Demon Rum by Wilfrid Laurier

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“Lieutenant Lunt of the 4th Battalion remembered doling out rum to his boys and wishing them “best of luck” as he moved down the line before the Battle of Amiens on 8 August 1918.Coming across one green lad,he was shocked to find his teeth chattering so loudly that it sounded like he was breaking his jaw. Lunt plied him with four double rum shots before the shaking stopped.When they finally attacked, Lunt remembered seeing the young lad stumbling forward in a drunken daze before he was shot in the face.”

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Below is some gentle reading referencing the places mentioned and another selection of photos.

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Martinsart – (source ww1cemeteries.com) was close to the Allied front line until September 1916, and again from March to August 1918. Martinsart British Cemetery was begun at the end of June 1916, when 14 men of the 13th Royal Irish Rifles, killed by a shell, were buried in what is now Plot I, Row A. It was used as a front-line cemetery until October 1916 and again in September 1918, when bodies were brought in from the battlefields for burial by V Corps. After the Armistice, the cemetery was enlarged when more graves were brought in from the area north, east and south of the village.

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Beaumont-Hamel – (source Wikipedia) During the First World War, Beaumont-Hamel was very close to the front lines of the and saw heavy combat, especially during the Battle of the Somme which was the largest Allied offensive of the entire war. By 1918 the village was almost totally destroyed.

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Old wedding photo restoration in colour

Colouring an old wedding photo

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A few days ago Barrie Warby contacted me with a plea to help him fix up his mothers photo. Unfortunately it was stuck to glass and heavily faded. He posted me his prized photo, carefully wrapped, still in the frame, glass and all! The restoration process began.

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The image was stuck to the glass so i cleaned all the areas of exposed glass and air dusted underneath. After inserting some tiny foam circles onto the corners of the glass to avoid the “moire” effect or glass on glass, i scanned the image in high bit colour and in high-resolution. The image looked like a challenge straight away. The scan revealed heavy staining and detail loss where the dyes were affected by adhesion to the glass. Only one thing to do, convert to black and white and re-colour!

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Old wedding photo restored in colour

Old wedding photo restored in colour

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I set about correcting all tones, stain lines and fades and corrected these by using the patch tool, dodge and burn, clone, and healing brush tools. Once i could see an even image, the contrast needed boosting with “levels” and the image “multiplied” on new layer to give more contrast. This was masked out and selectively painted back in to give the image more punch.

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The whole image was recolored using separate layers, three colours on the brickwork for depth and realism. As always you can read about the colouring process in my colouring tutorials

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Here is the review Barrie gave me when he received the image.

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“The help and information I received was exceptional, the speed of service was excellent, once payment was made it was less than a week until I received my photos and the finished product was amazing, 10 times better than I could have imagined possible and worth every penny. I would recommend to anyone thinking of using this company.” Barrie Warby 01/06/2013

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Thanks Barrie!

Old photo restoration recent trends

I know that many of your are just reading this blog for a snippet of help so you can restore your old photos yourself, fair play, we all do research! It’s important to research both the techniques and the tools to use them.

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This post is more about recent trends we have noticed in photo restoration from our location in sunny green Hampshire. Photo restorations come to us in a variety of ages. Many folks that contact us, have modern photos that need repairing. The age of them is of no consequence to us, just that we can help restore the photos. A big part if this is photo colouring. Many of the photos we restore and colourize cannot be posted on our blog. You probably see great swathes of coloured images on the net, splashed around websites but not so many on this blog. Why is that? We always ask if images can be used on the blog but invariably the restorations are for special occasions and displaying them ahead of time could ruin the surprise.

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old photo restoration

If you want your old restored photo and story to be displayed on our blog please just get in touch

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Note: If you are one of our customers who wanted to have your story and image on the blog please get in touch and we can display your before and after, restored old photo, here with pride.

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Other reasons for not displaying images are bereavements, or breakups, emotional reasons. Photos are personal and not everyone wants to share them. Clients come from all backgrounds and when it comes to putting personal old photos on the web, understandably some are very cautious.

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There also technical reasons for not displaying your old photos on the web too. In recent weeks in the news,  “orphaned photos” have become a big topic of discussion. “Old orphaned” images can be harvested and used for personal gain. Basically an orphaned image is one without any digital tag, owner information or details from where it originated. Old restored photos are not always tagged correctly or contain any information at all. You should always make sure that your digital images are as protected as possible when displaying them. You don’t want you aged family heirloom becoming someone Else’s property. The are many articles about this in the web if you wished to investigate this further.

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Digital only restorations are also growing in popularity. In short, a digital file is provided to us by email or file upload and then restored and emailed back. This saves posting photos and any cost involved. There are a few drawbacks to this though. It’s not always possible to have control of the scanning of digitizing process of the old photo from the customer end. In order to properly quote for, restore to a high standard and provide the image in a choice of sizes the scan must be high resolution and scanned correctly in the first place.

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If you have any suggestions for future posts please just let us know!

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