The Waziristan campaign 1936–1939 comprised a number of operations conducted in Waziristan by British and Indian forces. This was against the fiercely independent tribesmen that inhabited this region. These operations were conducted in 1936–1939, when operations were undertaken against followers of the Pashtun nationalist Mirzali Khan. Also known by the British as the “Faqir of Ipi”, a religious and political agitator who was spreading anti-British sentiment in the region. Undermining the prestige of the Indian government in Waziristan at the time. (Wiki source)

Surprisingly sharp images.

The images show the journey the troops took through the area, their camp, outposts and transport. There are some images that show other key points in the area. The image may not be in the correct order. They are particularly sharp and some have great detail to investigate. Ladhay camp has a cropped section showing the “screw guns”.

View of the march en route to Razmak taken in 1936. This bridge is located between Bakakhel & Mir Ali on the road connecting Bannu & Miranshah.

View of the march en route to Razmak taken in 1936. This bridge is located between Bakakhel & Mir Ali on the road connecting Bannu & Miranshah.

 

River Bridge Near Mir Ali, Waziristan

River Bridge Near Mir Ali, Waziristan

 

Nearing journey's end. 3 miles from Razmak, Waziristan

Nearing journey’s end. 3 miles from Razmak, Waziristan

 

Column of Troops returning From Khaisora Operations To Razmak

A column of Troops returning From Khaisora Operations To Razmak

 

Ladhay camp, Waziristan, with British soldiers

Ladhay camp, Waziristan, with British soldiers

The large guns or field artillery used during the campaign were called “Screw guns”. These were so-called because they could be broken down for transport by donkey through the sometimes difficult terrain. They could then be reassembled by screwing the two halves of the barrel together.

Ladhay with British soldiers screw guns

Ladhay with British soldiers screw guns

 

Manning a lookout

Manning a lookout at one of the camps on the journey to Razmak

 

Ladhay with British soldiers - camp detail

Ladhay with British soldiers – camp detail

 

Ladhay with British soldiers

Ladhay camp with British soldiers

 

River rest stop on the way to Razmak 1936

River rest stop on the way to Razmak 1936

 

Convoy from Bannu to Razmak (76 Miles) (1936) - 6 Miles from Razmak

Convoy from Bannu to Razmak (76 Miles) (1936) – 6 Miles from Razmak

 

Convoy from Bannu to Razmak (76 Miles) (1936) - 6 miles from Razmak

Convoy from Bannu to Razmak (76 Miles) (1936) – 6 miles from Razmak

 

Local Tribesman

Local Tribesman

 

Local forces

Local forces

 

British troops take a roadside rest stop on the way to Razmak

British troops take a roadside rest stop on the way to Razmak

 

Tea time in one of the camps

Tea time in one of the camps

 

Tea time in one of the camps

Tea time in one of the camps

 

Damdil Camp on the way to Razmak

Damdil Camp on the way to Razmak

 

Entering Charles Street, Razmak

Entering Charles Street, Razmak

 

Razmak camp, view from adjacent mountain

Razmak camp, view from an adjacent mountain

 

Signpost somewhere along the journey

Signpost somewhere along the journey

 

Goats on mules

Goats on mules

Also in the collection are these shots of Mari Indus Railway Station. Perhaps the troops started or eventually ended up here as the campaign ended? “66, a GS class 2-8-2 locomotive, was a product of the North British Locomotive Company in Glasgow, 22770 of 1931. It was delivered to the Kalabagh – Bannu Railway which had a branch to Tank. The bridge across the Indus was opened in 1931. In practice the line was operated by the North Western Railway of India, hence the NWR on the tender.  ”

Pakistan Mari Indus Railway Station

Pakistan Mari Indus Railway Station

 

Mari Indus Railway Station

Mari Indus Railway Station

 

Mari Indus Railway Station checking the route.

Mari Indus Railway Station checking the route.

With thanks to Northampton Museums Flickr stream for help with identification. They seem to have a similar set of images taken on different days perhaps with different troop movements. Thanks to John Driver for use of his images.

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